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INTERACTIVE: Story Map Slavery in Old Abington

Wayne Tucker is an independent writer and researcher living south of Boston, Massachusetts.

wayne.tucker@gmail.com
@elevennames twitter

Notes

1 Hardesty, Jared. (2016). Unfreedom: Slavery and Dependence in Eighteenth-Century Boston. United Kingdom: NYU Press. Page 114.
2 Hardesty, J. (2020). Black Lives, Native Lands, White Worlds: A History of Slavery in New England. United States: University of Massachusetts Press. Preface page xv.
3 Hardesty, J. (2020). Black Lives, Native Lands, White Worlds: A History of Slavery in New England. United States: University of Massachusetts Press. Preface page xv.
4 Hardesty makes this claim in the book talk below and several other talks/podcasts. I am trying to find a reasonable print source to link to.

MORE: Introduction to slavery in Massachuetts and New England resource page

Bibliography

Abington, Mass. First Church records 1714-1949, RG4969. The
Congregational Library & Archives, Boston, MA

Abington (Mass.)., New England Historic Genealogical Society. (1912). Vital records of Abington, Massachusetts: to the year 1850. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, at the charge of the Eddy town-record fund

Bates, J. (1830). Plan of Abington made by James Bates, dated 1830 [Map]

Hardesty, Jared R. (2019). Black Lives, Native Lands, White Worlds: A History of Slavery in New England. United States: University of Massachusetts Press.

Hobart, Benjamin (1866). History of the town of Abington, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, from its first settlement. Boston: T.H. Carter and son.

Massachusetts. Office of the Secretary of State. (1896-1908). Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolutionary War: A compilation from the archives. Boston: Wright and Potter Printing Co., State Printers.

Massachusetts. Office of the Secretary of State. Muster rolls (index file cards) of the Revolutionary War, 1767-1833. (Digital Collection, Family Search.)

Massachusetts. (Accessed 2021). Guide: Massachusetts Constitution and the Abolition of Slavery. Mass.gov

National Daughters of the Revolution. (2012). Forgotten Patriots: African American and American Indian Service in the Revolutionary War, 1775-1783. Washington, D.C. .pdf

Peirce, E. Weaver., Mitchell, Zerviah Gould. (1878). Indian history, biography and genealogy: pertaining to the good sachem Massasoit of the Wampanoag tribe, and his descendants. With an appendix. North Abington, Mass.: Z. G. Mitchell.

Pilgrim Society and Pilgrim Hall Museum. (2018) New Exhibition at Pilgrim Hall Museum Wampanoag World: Patuxet to Plymouth February 24 – December, 30 2018. Plymouth, MA. .pdf press release

Plymouth County, MA: Probate File Papers, 1686-1881

Railton, Ben(2017, July 3). How two Massachusetts slaves won their freedom — and then abolished slavery. Washington Post.

Massachusetts Historical Commission/Abington Historical Commission Documents

Additional Media

This is an EXCELLENT independent mini-documentary detailing an enslaved man and his descendants in Norwell, Massachusetts.
Historian Mary Blauss Edwards presents 4 intriguing stories about Black life in 1790s Massachusetts.

In Teweelema, Betty’s Neck and Wampanoag Rye-straw Basketry, artist and researcher Gerry Brion posts further insight into Zerviah Gould Mitchell’s life and details how she and her daughters preserved Wampanoag ways through artistry.

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Copyright Wayne Tucker 2022. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License